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5 Ways To Drive Learning Innovation

We’re delighted with the news that PAULEY has been shortlisted for not just one, but two leading industry awards. In celebration, we’ve created a list of the five top ways to bring innovation into your organisation’s learning, training and development.

We’ve been nominated as a result of the advanced eLearning and virtual reality tools we’ve created for the state-of-the-art, multi-million pound National Training Academy for Rail (NTAR).

As a joint entry, PAULEY and NTAR are up for an award in “Training and Development” at the UK Rail Industry Awards 2016 and for “Innovation in Learning” at the Learning and Performance Institute’s 2016 Learning Awards.

Both awards ceremonies will be held in February, when the winners will be announced. Our fingers are crossed!

We’re incredibly proud of these successes, no matter what the final outcome. It’s fantastic to see the first UK rail trainees starting to use—and be inspired by—the immersive learning experiences we’ve created for them.

So, how can you start innovating with your in-house training and development?

NTAR_066Here are five ways to get started…

1. Experiment and spread your bets

Innovation isn’t cheap and the nature of it is that you find out what works and what doesn’t as you go along. Not everything is going to be a success just because you throw money at it. However, finding something that does work could save a huge amount on training costs and give you a rapid return on investment.

Start by investing in several smaller innovation projects, in the hope that one or two of them will prove their staying power. Depending on the size of your organisation, you could choose to work on these in parallel, or develop one at a time, learning from one to build on the next iteration.

2. Look at your learning culture

Companies at the cutting edge, such as Google, famously allow their employees time for pursuing personal projects. They argue that this time is essential for fostering innovation.

While you may not have the resources to give your staff a day every week to daydream, there are ways of gathering their ideas and encouraging creativity. Be sure to gather feedback from your employees on their learning and development and make sure it’s listened to. Or try running group debates or brainstorms to gather new ideas.

3. Find the key staff to achieve the vision

Every project needs spokespeople. Seek out the employees who seem to have an affinity to new technology and innovation and ask them what they think, give them ownership. Hopefully, their enthusiasm will be contagious and will spread upwards and downwards through your organisation to drive support for greater investment in innovative learning.NTAR_057

4. Find accessible technology partners

We’re always willing to offer free consultations and hands-on demos to organisations who know they want to innovate their learning but aren’t sure how. Choosing an innovation partner who is willing to create a bespoke solution for your organisation is vital.

5. Start small, aim high

We’ve worked with companies who have started simply: for example, by converting their paper-based CPD courses into electronic content. Often, those companies then see the results and want to go the extra step, and then maybe the next one, often all the way up to creating virtual reality classrooms by way of steady, incremental increases in innovation.

Those steps along the way are vital for smaller and medium-sized organisations in particular: you see what works best for your people and can gather funding one stage at a time until you have a range of transformative learning experiences that works for all.

If you’d like to explore how our cutting edge solutions could transform the way people learn in your organisation, please get in touch today!

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