Tag Archives: gamification

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VR Set to Collide With Pop Culture at London Film & Comic Con’s Inaugural VR Zone

As 2016 rolls on, virtual and augmented realities are increasingly hitting the spotlight. We’ll be showcasing the latest developments, connecting with early adopters and networking with the best developers from the UK and beyond at this July’s London Film & Comic Con by powering the event’s inaugural VR Zone. 

What’s the big deal about virtual and augmented realities?

Virtual reality (VR) transports the user out of their everyday world and immerses them in a 360-degree environment. While VR headsets are generally more affordable and accessible at the moment, thanks to low cost headsets such as Google Cardboard and Gear VR, most headsets have to be tethered to a computer. VR has growing applications for videogames, as well as viewing films, sporting and music events and promos for the latest TV series.

Augmented reality (AR) superimposes interactive digital content into the real world, blending real and virtual realities. Unlike VR, AR systems are standalone and don’t need to be tethered to a computer but this evolving technology is more expensive and still largely in development. Many headsets are being developed specifically for businesses and industry, potentially sparking the next Industrial Revolution.

There’s little doubt that VR and AR are going to be big. CCS Insight is predicting that 800,000 VR headsets will be sold in the UK this year—an impressive number for what’s still classed as an emerging industry. In the longer term, VR market revenue is likely to reach $30 billion by 2020, with AR reaching around $90 billion.

The new reality movement needs a central hub, so we’re building it…

PAULEY’s mission is to become the definitive source of information for mixed realities and immersive technologies, and we will be constantly striving to achieve this goal. Our new pages offer a one-stop source of information, news and views for consumers and developers alike.

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Our brand new VR/AR Resource Centre is designed to help users explore science, technology, engineering and maths through our pick of the best immersive, virtual and augmented worlds. Within this microsite, you can browse our favourite 360 videos, apps and games, sort by device and then click straight through to the download site.

We have also created a linked page that details the hardware and peripherals already on the market and those soon set to join it. The aim of this is to empower anyone interested in immersive media by walking them through the options and helping them understand the best way to get involved. Take a look now to see how you can enter virtual and augmented worlds on your own terms by choosing the headset and creation tools that are right for you.

In addition, we’ve created an online community for VR, AR and mixed reality developers. Here, developers will find advice, tips and useful resources for working in the field of VR and AR development. This network will also connect developers with job opportunities, and unite employers with a community of leading British developers.

As always, we’ll continue to publish the most exciting, inspiring, up-to-date news on our Tech Review microsite, where you’ll also find our blog posts and other updates.

Introducing new realities to the London Film & Comic Con’s VR Zone

We’re excited to be hosting this massive event’s very first virtual reality and immersive technologies area, the VR Zone, alongside the annual themes of movies, TV, comics, sports, wrestling, literature and games.

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By showcasing the most inspiring, state-of-the-art developments in the field today, the VR Zone will form a major part of our effort to engage people with emerging technologies, and to raise the profile of VR, AR, and 360 video developers and companies from the UK and beyond.

We will be tapping into the diversity of the London Film & Comic Con’s 100,000 attendees and vast associated media attention, using it as an outstanding opportunity to bring virtual reality right into the centre of the entertainment industry and into people’s lives. We hope to replicate the success of the event’s Young Adult Literature Convention, which runs alongside the main event to attract a youthful demographic and which successfully positions reading in the wider arena of popular culture.

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We’re seeking a few more exciting developers to join us in showcasing their product or solution to a diverse, enthusiastic audience. So please do email info@pauley.co.uk or give us a call on 01908 522 532 if you’re interested in getting involved!

Anyone interested in attending as a visitor can buy Comic Con tickets here.

We hope to see you at the VR Zone to help us celebrate the exciting future of VR, AR and immersive realities!

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Blending Reality in Classrooms for the Benefit of All

Long gone are the days of rote learning around the blackboard with the teacher holding a half-broken piece of chalk. Classrooms have become more hi-tech, with interactive whiteboards now a standard centrepiece for group learning, and increasing numbers of teachers eager to experiment with the latest touchscreens and mobile devices. Could virtual reality (VR) be the next big thing?

VR training has already been widely adopted by commercial companies, games developers and the military. Even in the medical field, more devices and apps are catering to improving the skills of doctors and surgeons using both virtual and mixed reality.

Interest in VR is growing exponentially into other sectors, such as education, because of the rapid technological advances in the hardware (see this recent blog for our review of the field). Portable headsets are now making immersive experiences possible in everyday settings.

The advantages of VR in education

Researchers in the field have already seen the benefits of VR in schools.  It seems, when used correctly, that this approach can strengthen the overall learning experience.

It’s often stated that the typical person can remember 20% of what we hear, 30% of what we see and up to 90% of what we do or experience. That gives some clue to the revolutionary effectiveness of VR—what we call active participation learning.

Advantages include:

  • Simplifying learning by more direct communication of concepts and less symbolism, reducing the cognitive load when students are learning.
  • Enabling the student to have a completely personal learning experience.
  • Increasing attention span as a result of doing something enjoyable and motivating.
  • Providing the ability to see and experience things/places that couldn’t otherwise be accessed.
  • Encouraging group activity and interaction—and even global link-ups.
  • Offering students a boost to their digital literacy and computing skills.
  • Boosting a teacher’s ability to be creative with content in a brand new medium.
  • Improving opportunities for students who struggle to make sense of traditional forms of communication, e.g. children with dyslexia.

VR for teaching science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM)

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There are huge opportunities for VR across the breadth of education but STEM subjects may be set to benefit the most from immersing students in content.

The success of Minecraft goes some way towards demonstrating this. This videogame—which involves creating structures inside 3D environments—made the leap into schools as educators realised its potential. Minecraft has been successful in improving visual-spatial skills and collaboration between students as they build scale models and “walk through” the structures they have created.

VR takes that one step further by immersing students in a virtual world. In a VR environment, students can walk around mathematical graphs and 3D surfaces, explore examples of complex engineering up close, and experiment in a laboratory without fear of doing anything dangerous or costly. It is possible to take a tour through the human body, from the perspective of a blood cell or molecule.

The World of Comenius project, for example, is using Oculus Rift headsets and Leap Motion controllers to deliver educational content. Still in development, the final program may include experience such as playing around with atoms at the quantum level, meeting people from history and exploring their world, or swimming around inside a cell.

The Tennessee Aquarium Conservation Initiative has created a VR experience in which students can snorkel down the Conasauga River to explore its biodiversity and the issues of pollution and conservation.

Immersive 360-degree videos are proliferating on Facebook and YouTube, giving viewers a sense of depth in every direction. New consumer gadgets such as Samsung’s Gear 360 camera will make creating these types of videos straightforward for anyone, too.

Short documentaries are already being made specifically for viewing in VR, which temporarily transport the viewer into complex and difficult situations such as civil unrest in Hong Kong and the Ebola epidemic.

A new kind of learning experience

Using VR in education may actually alter the way in which we learn as it blurs and redefines the boundaries of formal education. Experiences can start to reach far beyond the classroom.

VR is a way to not only consume content but also to create content as part of the learning experience. Students can get involved with programming, problem solving and exploration of this new technology.

New VR learning platforms will offer teachers and students the ability to create avatars and create multi-player sessions to achieve a previously unattainable level of socialisation and outreach.

VR technologies such as 8i will allow 3D videos of teachers to be seen in VR—allowing students not only to see and listen to them, but also to walk around them and feel that they are sharing the same room. This remote, emotional connection would be ideal for tutoring at a distance, virtual classrooms and eventually live streaming conversations.

In the future, as augmented reality (AR) becomes accessible the opportunities are even more exciting, because students could visualise holographic-style media overlaid onto their real world surroundings.

Making VR a reality

It’s true that the vast majority of VR and AR technologies already on the market—or soon to be released—are relatively expensive pieces of kit, mainly targeting developers. Yet, as uptake increases, prices are set to become more affordable.

Low-cost routes into VR are available through simpler devices such as Google Cardboard that can be purchased for around £10 and make use of normal smartphones. Google’s Expeditions initiative is aiming to bring “virtual field trips” to every classroom.

At PAULEY, we’re passionate about integrating new forms of virtual, augmented and mixed reality into education to give pioneering educators an exciting opportunity to accelerate learning. With VR, here are truly no boundaries to where we can go and what we can learn.

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Work Smarter, Not Harder: Boost Digital Sales & Engagement With Interactive Content

Investing in interactive digital content will help sales teams struggling to close deals by delivering clear, cohesive messages and effectively demonstrating even the most visually inaccessible products.

The thought of investing in bespoke digital sales software can be scary. But what if it promised a rapid 100% return on marketing investment and long-term boost to sales?

The benefits of equipping your sales team with interactive content for field sales, exhibitions, and presentations are numerous, and, designed well, can grow with your business.

Cisco, for example, have used gaming strategies to enhance its virtual global sales meeting and call centres to reduce call time by 15% and improve sales by 10%.

People love interactivity. Our brains are programmed to respond to colour, movement, sound and physical interaction. Interactive digital sales content can deliver this, resulting in deeper engagement every time.

Providing your potential customers with exciting and inspiring mobile apps, dynamic websites, touch screen displays tailored to your business will lead to:

  • An uplift in sales & an enhanced sales pipeline
  • A happier, more confident sales team
  • A lasting impression and greater memorability for your brand

The outcomes for products that are hard to visualize or demonstrate to potential customers – either because they take no physical form, can’t be seen in action, are technically complex, or can’t be brought into meetings – are especially impressive.

You only have to look at the Audi R8 V10 Plus advert to see that insight into the interior of a product can be hugely powerful in demonstrating its value, its appeal and its worth.

Creating unique media such as eBrochures, 3D animations, product simulations and 360° tours of such products will result in more sales, thanks to sales staff being able to show rather than tell what you sell. This type of interactive digital sales content will:

  • Enable your team to close deals anywhere, anytime
  • Equip sales team to explain products accurately and consistently
  • Render visually uninspiring products eye-catching
  • Make complex processes understandable and memorable
  • Demonstrate how your product fits the precise needs of potential customers

Uptake in interactive digital sales applications is growing fast. Gartner predict that more than 70% of the world’s largest 2,000 companies are expected to have deployed at least one “gamified” application by the end of 2014. It’s time to get on board.

Need further convincing? Take a look at our testimonials to hear from happy clients in their own words.

Stay ahead of the competition and request a free consultation with us today! Get in touch for advice and a no obligation chat about digital sales by calling 01908 522532 or emailing info@pauley.co.uk.

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Gamification: 4 Ways to Turn Work into a Game

  • Gamification is the process of applying gaming tactics to everyday systems to increase engagement
  • It increases the strength of your brand with customers and clients
  • It boosts employee skills and satisfaction

Even if the term ‘gamification’ is a buzzword of the moment, the process is far more than a hot trend. The concept — redesigning routines, tasks and interactions to be more game-like – will not be going away any time soon.

Executed well, gamification encourages interactivity, engagement and improves productivity as well as the memorability of anything from product demonstrations to training tools, recruitment, and social media marketing. It can change behaviours, develop skills and enable innovation.

1. Viral and word-of-mouth marketing

There is a sector in which creativity can make the smallest budget go a long way. The right idea can enable you to reach a much wider audience than normal and work as a tool to actively engage with you and your business. The daily Google Doodle is a great example of how retro graphics and straightforward game-play can be a hard-to-beat engagement tool.

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2. E-learning for your workforce

A report published at the start of 2013 by Gartner suggested that 70% of large global companies will have at least one gamified application on their learning management system by 2014. At PAULEY, we’d like to see more companies moving away from paper-based training tools for competency management to a digital interactive experience that is more portable, more incentivising and memorable, more traceable, and more cost effective over the long term. Gamifying training can also provide real-time feedback for skills-based training.

3. Building online communities

If you are trying to build up the strength and community of an online forum for customers and clients, or even employees, the right kind of gamification can promote participation by offering rewards and improving the status of those taking part. A common tool involves using labels and badges to offer kudos to users for reaching specific goals, depending on whether you want them to generate discussion, respond to votes or offer opinion.

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4. Product demonstrations and marketing

We love helping our clients to create product sales tools with the wow factor. And gamification can be integrated into this kind of marketing, too. Game mechanics offer added value for existing customers and capture the attention of new ones. Being creative is vital: how could you encourage people to interact with and explore your product in new ways? Even the band Linkin Park gamified the release of their latest album, creating a Facebook game with prizes which included limited-edition tracks and artwork.

Incorporating game dynamics and mechanics will drive desired behaviours, whatever it is you want your customers, clients or employees to do. To get the outcomes you want, we always consider the following:

  • Intuitive, balanced design – simplicity is key, acting to directly connect activity with reward. The gamified product should work seamlessly and clearly on all the devices you want it to, from iPads to smartphones and PCs.
  • Linked to natural behaviours – gamification should be a natural extension of typical routines and behaviours to keep users engaged, blending collaboration, reward, variety and surprise.
  • Earn valuable data – ensure that the process generates data which meets your business objectives and gets you what you want. It should also offer you the ability to anticipate improvements and resolve problems.

At PAULEY, we can help you to create meaningful, interactive tools for your business. Get in touch and we’d be happy to chat.

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